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The John Beavan Geodetic Fieldwork Award

The John Beavan Geodetic Fieldwork Fund was established as a memorial to Dr John Beavan (1950-2012) whose career was strongly influenced by his love of both mathematical physics and the outdoors. The purpose of the fund is to support students involved with geodetic research to undertake or participate in associated fieldwork in New Zealand or the southwest Pacific region (including Antarctica). Awards can be made either directly to the student to undertake his or her own fieldwork associated with a research project, or to a more senior researcher, to reimburse the expenses associated with including the student in the fieldwork. The latter is intended to encourage experienced fieldworkers to take along students who might otherwise not get a chance to work with them.

Nomination template link below.

Rules

1. The John Beavan Geodetic Fieldwork Fund was set up by the Committee of the Society on 17 June 2014, as a memorial to Dr John Beavan (1950-2012) whose career was strongly influenced by his love of both mathematical physics and the outdoors.

2. The purpose of the fund is to support students involved with geodetic research to undertake or participate in associated fieldwork in New Zealand or the southwest Pacific region (including Antarctica). Awards can be made either directly to the student to undertake his or her own fieldwork associated with a research project, or to a more senior researcher, to reimburse the expenses associated with including the student in the fieldwork. The latter is intended to encourage experienced fieldworkers to take along students who might otherwise not get a chance to work with them.

3. To be eligible for this award, the student must be engaged in geodetic research based at a New Zealand university. For this purpose, the term "geodetic" is to be interpreted broadly to include global, regional and local scale measurement and representation of the Earth, including its gravitational field and geodynamical phenomena such as crustal stresses and motions, tides, and polar motion. Preference will be given to students with strong quantitative skills.

4. The aim of the award is to cover or contribute to the expenses of the fieldwork. This would cover such things as travel, food, and accommodation costs, as well as equipment hire, the cost of permits, insurance, and other incidentals. The award does not have a budgetary limit, but will be awarded on merit as judged by the selection panel (see below.) An indicative budget might be on the order of $1000-$3000 for New Zealand based projects or $4000 for the wider SW Pacific or Antarctica.

5. The two ways the award can be applied for are as follows.
a. An application can be made by a student undertaking fieldwork as a component of his or her own research. The application will be for an award up to a maximum amount to cover or contribute to the costs of fieldwork.
b. An application can be made by a lead researcher in order to include a student in fieldwork associated with some sort of geodetic research. The application will be for an award up to a maximum amount to reimburse the lead researcher for the expenses associated with the student's participation in the fieldwork.

6. Applications can be received at any time in the year. This is to allow for the fact that fieldwork occurs year round, and the involvement of students in that fieldwork often occurs on a short time frame. Completed applications shall be sent to the GSNZ Administrator for forwarding to the Convenor of the Awards Subcommittee who shall make recommendations to the Committee for ratification - usually at their next regular committee meeting. Appropriate deadlines to meet this schedule are 31 January, 31 May and 15 September annually. Awards will be made at the discretion of the committee.

7. Applications should include:
• a CV of the student,
• a one-page statement of the research intended,
• a budget of planned expenses to be covered by the award,
• a letter of support from the lead researcher or research project supervisor, and
• the name of at least one additional referee.

8. The award amount will be based on the budget of planned expenses submitted by the applicant. The amount of the award should only be related to the costs associated with the student's participation (such as travel, food, accommodation). The award should not be used to subsidise costs that would be incurred if the student did not participate in the fieldwork.

9. If an award is made and the research is not undertaken, the award must be returned to the society.

10. No student may receive more than one award.

11. Within 12 months of receiving the award, the student is responsible for submitting a short report on the research undertaken to the Chair of the Society's Awards subcommittee for inclusion in the Geoscience Society of New Zealand Newsletter.

12. There is no limit to the number of awards that can be provided in any one year. When the John Beavan Geodetic Fieldwork Fund has less than $1000 remaining, the balance should be transferred into Geoscience Society of New Zealand's Legacy Fund, for the general purposes of that fund.

13. Recipients will be formally acknowledged during the presentation of society awards at the annual conference. As part of the award, students will be presented with information on John Beavan's contributions to geodesy in New Zealand.

The nomination template is here .
Due date September 1.

The John Beavan Geodetic Fieldwork Award recipients

Year

Person

From

For

2018
Emma Cody
MasseyQuantifying slope response to glacial retreat in the Aoraki/Mt Cook National Park with emphasis on the mechanics, processes and risks posed by these failure events.
2017
Not awarded
  
2016
Robert PickleAuckland
Geodetic surveys in the upper North Island to investigate active deformation of the Hauraki Rift.
2015
Sam Taylor-OfordVictoriaTemporal, spatial, and seismic response of the Tasman Glacier to changing basal water pressure.